Tag Archives: vegetables

Wonderful Winter Squash: Tips and Tricks From A Master Gardener

Winter squash is easy to prepare and a good source of vitamins A and K

Winter squash is easy to prepare and a good source of vitamins A and K

by donR November 6, 2015

Winter squash comes in different sizes, shapes, and colors and they all contain important micro-nutrients.  When I told Gloria Perez that “Winter Squash” was my topic for a presentation at the Senior Center, she said “Wonderful.” She is the master gardener for the Ferndale Friendship Community Garden in Ferndale, Washington and she then began to tell how easy and important it is to include squash in a family meal plan. Here are five of the many ‘tips and tricks’ she shared: Continue reading

Cooking 101: EZ Cooked Vegetables

These veggies are complex carbohydrates.

These veggies are complex carbohydrates.

by donR  July 28, 2015

The USDA, a department of the US government recommends that we fill half of our plate with vegetables. But how many of us really do it? Any answer would be debatable and besides, that’s not the important question. A better question to ask would be, “How does one cook inexpensive vegetables in a way that preserves nutrients, is easy to fix, and tasty enough to eat every night?”  Here are five things to think about if you want to answer that question. Continue reading

A Well-Stocked Pantry; Part 3

Does your family meal plan include enough vegetables and fruit?

Does your family meal plan include enough vegetables and fruit?

The USDA recommends that 50% of our dinner plate be filled with vegetables and fruit. But can you guess what percentage of the average grocery bill goes towards fruit and veggies?  Americans spend only about 14% according to a Huffington Post Article.  In this third part of the “Stocking Your Pantry” series, we’ll give you some ideas about what veggies to always have in your pantry (food storage areas). Continue reading

Ferndale Food Bank August Meal of the Month: Stir-Fried Veggies

Stir-fried vegetables can be the main ingredient for dinner. Simply  add cooked condiments like seafood, meat, cheese poultry and fruit  for a complete meal.

Stir-fried vegetables can be the main ingredient for dinner. Simply add cooked condiments like seafood, meat, cheese poultry and fruit for a complete meal.

The Ferndale Friendship Community Garden donates over 1000 pounds of produce each year to the Ferndale food bank. August is a good time to take advantage of those nutritious vegetables so we are using them in our August meal of the month.

Continue reading

Mom said “Eat your veggies.”‘ But are some better for you?

Which of these vegetables  are the best nutritionally?

Which of these vegetables are the best nutritionally?

The Simple answer is “Yes!”  But to say which ones are better requires that you know why you are eating them in the first place. Now the question becomes very complicated. I’ll try to simplify the answer and tell you which are better for you. Continue reading

Mom Says “Eat Your veggies.” Are they ready yet?

Mom Says, “Eat Your veggies.” Are they ready yet?

pic of cut vegetables

Plan to wash, cut and blanch veggies ahead of time. It saves time and energy when cooking dinner.

Yes, prepping fresh vegetables takes time and energy but The USDA recommends that 1/2 of your plate be filled with them. Some of us take pleasure in working with veggies and others are looking for ways to make it simpler. Usually we wash, cut and cook vegetables while assembling the rest of the meal which can be hectic sometimes. but, if you just prepare them ahead of time or include them in your total meal plan you can simplify cooking for dinner. Here are five ideas for including veggies in your plan. Continue reading

Vegetables grnerally retain more nutrients when steamed or roasted (baked).

Vegetables generally retain more nutrients when steamed or roasted (baked).

Should vegetables be cooked? The answer is “It depends.” Each variety of vegetable contains differing amounts and types of nutrients. Some nutrients become depleted in boiling water, while others, like kidney beans, contain toxins and should always be boiled. Others need to be cooked in order for the body to absorb the nutrients. Confused yet?   Don’t be, because we found a chart that will help you select the best cooking method. Continue reading

Grilled Shish K Bobs: simple, delicious and healthy.

 

Picture of Shish K bobs

    Ke-Babs (kabobs, k’bobs, Shish-K-Bobs) are defined loosely as marinated meat on sticks which are    cooked on a grill.   But, they are now commonly made with assorted meat, fish, vegetables and fruit.  They can be grilled, baked, broiled and cooked on a barbeque.Have fun making these and let the kids help.  Use imagination. Here is a simple recipe that uses home-made teriyaki sauce* in a marinade.

1. Make a marinade sauce for the meat and vegetables:  In a bowl, combine 1/2 C olive oil, 1/2 C teriyake sauce*, 1/2 t oregano, parsley, garlic powder and thyme.

2. If using meat or poultry, cut it into 1  1/2″  cubes.

3. Place meat in a glass bowl and add marinade to cover. Refrigerate for 8 hours.

3. Cut vegetables and fruit into 1 1/2″ cubes

4. Place meat, vegetables and fruit on water-soaked skewers by using the  pointed end to poke a hole and push the ingredient through . Alternate food types to look attractive.

5. Heat the grill or barbeque. Place the kabobs on the hot grill and cook for 3-4 minutes until the meats reaches 165 degrees and veggies are crisp-tender. Turn often.

Possible meat and veggies: pork , lamb and beef steaks, chicken breast, tofu, shrimp, summer squash, tomatoes, bell pepper, sweet onion, mushroom, pineapple, pear, apple and kiwi.

Here is a site with 28 K bob recipes: http://www.cooks.com

*Make-it-yourself teriyaki sauce:

Ingredients:                1./2 C shoyu (soy sauce)

1 ½ C water                           2 T minced ginger

¼ C packed brown sugar   2 minced garlic cl

3 T cornstarch                          1/3 C cool water

1 Combine the first 5 ingredients in a Saucepan.

2. Bring to a slow boil while stirring.
3. In a cup, dissolve cornstarch in water and

4. add it to the sauce. Continue stirring until sauce thickens.

5. Cool and refrigerate in a covered glass jar.