Tag Archives: table talk

Food, Fun, & Conversation: 4 Weeks To Better Family Dinners

FDP Wkshpby donR    Updated August 12, 2015

You and your family can explore ways to have food fun & conversation around the family dinner table. For more information or to join the workshops and Community Dinners, follow the links below.

  • Log onto TheFamilyDinnerProject website and sign-up for “Food Fun and Conversation: 4 Weeks to Better Family Dinners.” this is a “Do-it-yourself” version. However they offer lots of Tips, Tricks and suggestions for support.
  • Contact them about any Community Dinners in your area or
  • Join us locally for Workshops and Community Dinners in Whatcom County, WA. They will begin in late September. Watch our events calendar for more information. Read more to learn about the workshops and Community Dinners:

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Healthier Pizza For Kids

Personal pizzas using tortilla shells are simple and easy on the budget.

Personal pizzas using tortilla shells are simple and easy on the budget.

Okay. Most kids love pizza but should it be served regularly as a meal? We have shared ways to reduce the calories by creating whole wheat crusts with veggie toppings and limiting the cheese. Eliminating some of the cheese certainly cuts back on the saturated fat but we have found that kids like pizza because of the cheese. They also love Mac & Cheese, toasted cheese sandwiches, and string cheese. The real issue then is will they like pizza made with reduced saturated fat and less sugar? We think they will and here’s how. Continue reading

Five Dinner Table Questions: Share With Family

 

The right questions at the dinner table can inspire conversation and build positive relationships between family members.

The right questions at the dinner table can inspire conversation and build positive relationships between family members.

Anil Gupta suggests five questions be posed at the dinner table. These conversation starters are non-threatening and everyone can contribute to the conversation. Anil’s workshops focus on building relationships which is important as the family sits around the dinner table. Continue reading

The Sit-Down Meal: Conversation Starters III

Need a  source for witty, probing, interesting, challenging, , funny, intuitive,  and totally age-appropriate conversation starters?   No, you don’t need to find a toastmaster  book at Barnes & Nobel.  All you need to do is click on this link to The Family Dinners Project and you will find  enough material to keep your family engaged in meaningful conversation for years to come. Continue reading

Sit-Down Meals: Conversation Starters II

Pleasant conversation at meal time is important.

Pleasant conversation at meal time is important.

Conversation Starters II

Sit-down meals with nurturing conversation help children learn and practice positive life skills. The Promoting Family Meals Project out of Purdue University has conducted studies that support this conclusion. Continue reading

Sit-Down Meals: Conversation Starters

Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people.

Lively conversations at the dinner table make dining a memorable event.

How about this conversation starter: “What happened in school today?” This could be a perfectly fine question to ask your children and they might talk about school  for hours. On the other hand, if your child had an embarrassing moment at school or was sent to the office…oops, maybe not the best way to start an open discussion. It all depends on your family’s comfort level.

Here are some sure-fire ways I used in the classroom to start and keep conversations going among students. These work in the home as well. Continue reading

The Sit-Down Meal: Table Talk Do’s and Don’ts

Table Talk Do’s and Don’ts.

Open conversation is important during a sit-down meal.

Open conversation is important during a sit-down meal.

Lots of recent studies have shown that children who engage in meaningful talks during a sit-down family dinner grow to become well-adjusted citizens. But some find it difficult to talk openly with others, especially the teens I have worked with.

Someone told me years ago, “It takes different kinds of people to make ‘people.'” Some are outgoing, others withdrawn, bold or reserved. There are many who prefer to just listen and let others dominate every conversation. Everyone is different. But at the dinner table, there are some strategies that help stir conversation. Continue reading